There is another type of cotton rope I’ve seen, which I picked up at a Mitre 10 a couple years back for fairly cheap

I wouldn’t bother with trying to get something to look particularly pretty or to do a complex tie. That said, for restraint, this will generally get the job done. It takes natural fibre dye surprisingly well, given the already existing golden colour. Has a really, really nice smell – sort of earthy and warm. Which is fantastic! It’s always great to have some idea of exactly how much your rope can take. For our purposes though, what’s great about this bondage rope is the way it feels. Sometimes even scars, if the rope is thin enough and the pressure is applied forcefully enough. I recommend rope of 5 millimeters or above for safety reasons. “Natural Fiber” Ropes:. Hemp, Jute, Sisal, Cotton, Coconut.

5 millimetre tossa jute. Pros:. And naturally I’ll tell you which are my favorites and why, but at the end of the day I’ll leave you to make up your own mind, based on your own sets of priorities, which may very well be different from mine. I’ll even include pictures! Aren’t I just the nicest? It’s not particularly aesthetic. You don’t get great photo worthy ties with it; though you still get a restrained person, which is always good, and may be all you want in your photo.

That stuff is vastly overpriced for what it is. A Bunnings, Mitre 10, or other hardware store will have you covered for most things; the Internet will get the rest. This is another synthetic bondage rope, and has many of the same properties of that rope mentioned immediately above, particularly in regards to friction. However, there are some advantages and improvements with this one which I will go over. Next we have a Zenith All-Purpose rope, which is a solid polypropylene braid. This is another synthetic bondage rope, and has many of the same properties of that rope mentioned immediately above, particularly in regards to friction. That stuff is vastly overpriced for what it is. A Bunnings, Mitre 10, or other hardware store will have you covered for most things; the Internet will get the rest.

You don’t need to spend a lot of time maintaining it after the initial treatment. It actually polishes up and becomes shinier and smoother with use. There. End post. Let’s face it, price is a factor. It’s a really significant factor.

Con: Poly pro or mixed material does not take color well or consistently. Con: Stretches in inconsistent/unpredictable ways. Cons:. As synthetic ropes go, it’s a bit pricey. Hemp will do the job, and do it well – but you might want to source it from a known and trusted supplier, as opposed to an anonymous source (a “learn from my mistakes” moment! ) I’ve found hemp to be very different depending on where I got it from – and my Twisted Monk stuff is actually really up there. Would definitely recommend. Let’s face it, sometimes the Internet is just more convenient. Next we have a polypropylene webbing. It’s very light, very smooth, very fast. I could whip this around someone’s wrists into a column tie in nothing flat, with little to no fear of friction burn.

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